Ground breaking new technology to be trialled at the RS:X World Championship in Denmark

With much discussion in circles ranging from the Olympics to the America’s Cup over how to make sailing more attractive to a wider audience, so the 2010 RS:X World Championships starting in Kerteminde, Denmark this Saturday will feature a ground-breaking new way to follow the 120 Men and 74 Women competing via the internet. With much discussion in circles ranging from the Olympics to the America’s Cup over how to make sailing more attractive to a wider audience, so the 2010 RS:X World Championships starting in Kerteminde, Denmark this Saturday will feature a ground-breaking new way to follow the 120 Men and 74 Women competing via the internet. While all the RS:Xes at the championships will be fitted with GPS tracking units, provided by Danish company TracTrac, allowing each competitor to be followed around the race track in real time online, so the organisers intend to revolutionise the live video streaming to run in conjunction with both the tracking and live commentary. ‘Sailstream – You Are the Producer’ will comprise a number of cameras dotted around the race track, for example one will be on the committee boat, others on RIBs following the fleets around the course. Video from each camera will be beamed back to shore while on line spectators will be able to choose which stream they wish to see. “Instead of one camera, or having a producer on shore, we are making it possible for the user to select which cameras they view,” explains Jacob Møhl, from the regatta organisers, and the man responsible for Sailstream. “They can see their son or friend on the GPS tracker rounding a mark or on the start line, and can choose the camera which is closest. They can make their own viewing experience, their own TV channel. No one is telling the user what they should see - they choose what they think is the most exciting.” While this sounds relatively straightforward, the technology behind the process is all-new. Typically in live broadcast situations remote cameras beam images back to a base station ashore via a microwave link, but for the RS:X Worlds they will set up a giant wireless network across the race courses. As part of the technology they have created some racing marks fitted with the necessary wireless networking equipment to make this possible. “We have developed some marks and these actually spread the network around the course. We collect all the data on the starting boat and then we send that to shore with a point to point link,” explains Møhl. “The WiFi access points talk to each other automatically, so if one buoy is out of range, it uses the closest to get into the starting boat in order to get the best coverage.” This technology has been made possible as the company behind SailStream is the radio communications giant Zenitel, who, for example, run radio communications for police forces and fire brigades throughout the world. “They are used to handling situations where the communications is critical, so they are a perfect partner for this set-up,” says Møhl, who is pleased that it has been two Danish companies he has been working with on this project. While the equipment has been tested in the laboratory and on the water, this week Møhl is in the process of setting it up and trialing it in Kerteminde. It is likely that for the system’s first outing they will have three cameras on the water, but the possibilities beyond this are considerable, from having more cameras and ultimately even fitting them on board the RS:Xes themselves. “I hope that in the future we can make solutions like that because that would be great to make some small cameras that can connect easily to this new wireless network and then broadcast on to shore. That would be the ultimate solution,” concludes Møhl. Racing at the RS:X World Championships in Kerteminde starts this Sunday. There is a reserve day on Wednesday and the medal races for the top ten in each class are on Saturday, 4th September. The 2010 RS:X World Championships is one of many major international sailing events to be held in Denmark in recent years. This summer, Denmark has already hosted the SAP 505 World Championship. Denmark is bidding for the ISAF Sailing World Championship 2014, which will be the World Championship for all Olympic classes and the most important qualification event for the Olympic Games 2016 in Rio de Janiero. Denmark's official bid for the ISAF Sailing World Championship 2014 will be made this autumn. Listen to RS:X TeleSeries Session #4 We discuss the Sailstream System and how it all works Contact For more information on the 2010 RS:X World Championships contact regatta press officer Henrik Møhl, mail: [email protected], phone: +45 26 84 78 60 For further information about the Olympic RS:X class please visit rsxclass.com or contact the RS:X Class COO, Rory Ramsden, [email protected], +33 637500988 For more information on the Danish Sailing Association visit www.sejlsport.dk or contact press officer Christian M. Borch, mail: [email protected], phone: + 45 2360 0680
With much discussion in circles ranging from the Olympics to the America’s Cup over how to make sailing more attractive to a wider audience, so the 2010 RS:X World Championships starting in Kerteminde, Denmark this Saturday will feature a ground-breaking new way to follow the 120 Men and 74 Women competing via the internet. While all the RS:Xes at the championships will be fitted with GPS tracking units, provided by Danish company TracTrac, allowing each competitor to be followed around the race track in real time online, so the organisers intend to revolutionise the live video streaming to run in conjunction with both the tracking and live commentary. ‘Sailstream – You Are the Producer’ will comprise a number of cameras dotted around the race track, for example one will be on the committee boat, others on RIBs following the fleets around the course. Video from each camera will be beamed back to shore while on line spectators will be able to choose which stream they wish to see. “Instead of one camera, or having a producer on shore, we are making it possible for the user to select which cameras they view,” explains Jacob Møhl, from the regatta organisers, and the man responsible for Sailstream. “They can see their son or friend on the GPS tracker rounding a mark or on the start line, and can choose the camera which is closest. They can make their own viewing experience, their own TV channel. No one is telling the user what they should see - they choose what they think is the most exciting.” While this sounds relatively straightforward, the technology behind the process is all-new. Typically in live broadcast situations remote cameras beam images back to a base station ashore via a microwave link, but for the RS:X Worlds they will set up a giant wireless network across the race courses. As part of the technology they have created some racing marks fitted with the necessary wireless networking equipment to make this possible. “We have developed some marks and these actually spread the network around the course. We collect all the data on the starting boat and then we send that to shore with a point to point link,” explains Møhl. “The WiFi access points talk to each other automatically, so if one buoy is out of range, it uses the closest to get into the starting boat in order to get the best coverage.” This technology has been made possible as the company behind SailStream is the radio communications giant Zenitel, who, for example, run radio communications for police forces and fire brigades throughout the world. “They are used to handling situations where the communications is critical, so they are a perfect partner for this set-up,” says Møhl, who is pleased that it has been two Danish companies he has been working with on this project. While the equipment has been tested in the laboratory and on the water, this week Møhl is in the process of setting it up and trialing it in Kerteminde. It is likely that for the system’s first outing they will have three cameras on the water, but the possibilities beyond this are considerable, from having more cameras and ultimately even fitting them on board the RS:Xes themselves. “I hope that in the future we can make solutions like that because that would be great to make some small cameras that can connect easily to this new wireless network and then broadcast on to shore. That would be the ultimate solution,” concludes Møhl. Racing at the RS:X World Championships in Kerteminde starts this Sunday. There is a reserve day on Wednesday and the medal races for the top ten in each class are on Saturday, 4th September. The 2010 RS:X World Championships is one of many major international sailing events to be held in Denmark in recent years. This summer, Denmark has already hosted the SAP 505 World Championship. Denmark is bidding for the ISAF Sailing World Championship 2014, which will be the World Championship for all Olympic classes and the most important qualification event for the Olympic Games 2016 in Rio de Janiero. Denmark's official bid for the ISAF Sailing World Championship 2014 will be made this autumn. Listen to RS:X TeleSeries Session #4 We discuss the Sailstream System and how it all works Contact For more information on the 2010 RS:X World Championships contact regatta press officer Henrik Møhl, mail: [email protected], phone: +45 26 84 78 60 For further information about the Olympic RS:X class please visit rsxclass.com or contact the RS:X Class COO, Rory Ramsden, [email protected], +33 637500988 For more information on the Danish Sailing Association visit www.sejlsport.dk or contact press officer Christian M. Borch, mail: [email protected], phone: + 45 2360 0680

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